Advertisement

Diverse Gene Structure for Serum Amyloid a Protein in Wild Mice

  • K. Yamamoto
  • N. Goto
  • J. Kosaka
  • K. Mitomo
  • M. Shiroo
  • S. Migita
  • S. Nakayama
  • S. Nastuume-Sakai
Chapter

Abstract

Serum amyloid A ( SAA ) gene family comprises four members which are closely linked in the 79 kb region of mouse chromosome. Two of these genes determine major mouse SAA isotypes, SAA1 and SAA2. Some mouse strains derived from wild mice show 2-fold intense SAA1/SAA2 mRNA induction as compared with BALB/c mice during acute phase reaction. Southern blot analysis of chromosamal DNA from these wild mice reveals duplication of the SAA1 and SAA2 genes, indicating that increased expression of the SAA1 and SAA2 genes in these mice is due to gene duplication. Since defective SAA gene expression cause resistence to amyloidosis, enhanced SAA gene expression may cause higher susceptibility of these mice to amyloisosis.

Keywords

Gene Duplication Southern Blot Analysis Mouse Chromosome Acute Phase Reaction Wild Mouse 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Levin, M., Pras, M. and Franklin, E.C. J. Exp. Med. 138, 373 (1973)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Linke, R.P., Sipe, J.D., Pollock, P.S., Ignaczak, T.F. and Glenner, G.G. Proc nstl. Acad. Sci. USA 72, 1473 (1975)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Rosenthal, C.J., Franklin, E.C, Frangione, B. and Greenspan, J. J. Immunol. 116, 1415 (1976)Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Anders, R.F., Natvig, J.B., Sletten, K., Husby, G. and Nordstoga, K. J. Immunol. 118, 229 (1977)Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Benditt, E.P. and Eriksen, N. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 74, 4025 (1977)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Yamamoto, K. and Migita, S. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 82, 2915 (1985)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Yamamoto, K., Shiroo, M. and Migita, S. Science 232, 227 (1986)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Stearman, R.S., Lowell, CA., Peltzman, CG. and Morrow, J.F. Nucleic Acid Res. 14, 797 (1986)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Lowell, CA., Potter, D.A., Stearman, R.S. and Morrow, J.F. Biol. J. Chem. 261, 8442 (1986)Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Yamamoto, K., Goto, N., Kosaka, J., Shiroo, M., Dal Yeul, Y, and Migita, S. J. Immunol. 139, in press (1987)Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Hoffman, J.S. and Benditt, E.P. J. Biol. Chem. 257, 10510 (1982)Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Hoffman, J.S., Ericsson, L.H., Eriksen, E., Walsh, K.A. and Benditt, E.P. J. Exp. Med. 159, 641 (1984)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Blin, N. and Stafford, D. Nucleic Acids Res. 3, 2303 (1976)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    Southern, E.M. J. Mole. Biol. 98, 503 (1975)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    Chirgwin, J.M., Przybyla, A.E., McDonald, R.J. and Rutter, W.J. Biochemistry 18, 5294 (1979)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    Aviv, H. and Leder, P. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 77, 5201 (1972)Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    Thomas, P.S Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 77, 5201 (1980)CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. Yamamoto
    • 1
  • N. Goto
    • 1
  • J. Kosaka
    • 1
  • K. Mitomo
    • 1
  • M. Shiroo
    • 1
  • S. Migita
    • 1
  • S. Nakayama
    • 2
  • S. Nastuume-Sakai
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Molecular Immunology, Cancer Research InstituteKanazawa UniversityKanazawaJapan
  2. 2.Department of Immunobiology, Cancer Research InstituteKanazawa UniversityKanazawaJapan

Personalised recommendations