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Anti-Casein Antibodies in the Serum of Patients with Al Amyloidosis

  • Giampaolo Merlini
  • Takahashi Isobe
  • Peggy W. Moy
  • Maria L. Fiorentini
  • Elliott F. Osserman
Chapter

Summary

The casein model ie, the induction of amyloidosis in mice by repeated injection of casein, has commonly been used to study the pathogenesis of amyloidosis, and it has been presumed to be comparable to secondary (AA) amyloidosis in man. The mouse immune response to casein has been extensively investigated: low levels of anti-casein antibodies have been detected in the serum of mice injected with casein. Such low immune response has been attributed to oral tolerization by the substantial amount of casein present in normal mouse chow diet. An experimental system equivalent to primary (AL) amyloid disease in man has not been demonstrated, and the possible role of dietary casein in this disease has not been thoroughly investigated. We report the results of an investigation of serum anti-casein antibodies in patients with amyloidosis. 35 patients with AL amyloidosis, 39 with plasma cell dyscrasias apparently not associated with amyloidosis and 10 normal individuals were screened for anti-casein antibodies by an ELISA method. Low levels of anti-casein antibodies were found in 80% of patients with amyloidosis, significantly (p <0.001) higher than in patients with plasma cell dyscrasias (38%) or normal individuals (30%). The possible significance of these anti-casein antibodies present in low concentrations in a high percentage of patients with AL amyloidosis is discussed.

Keywords

Multiple Myeloma Amyloid Fibril Oral Tolerance Dietary Casein Plasma Cell Dyscrasia 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Giampaolo Merlini
    • 1
    • 2
  • Takahashi Isobe
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Peggy W. Moy
    • 1
    • 2
  • Maria L. Fiorentini
    • 1
    • 2
  • Elliott F. Osserman
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.College of Physicans and Surgeons and Dept. of Medicine Institute of Cancer ResearchColumbia UniversityNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Department of Internal Medicine, Institute of Clinical Medicine IIUniversity of PaviaItaly
  3. 3.Department of MedicineKobe Medical School, Kobe UniversityJapan

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