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Passive Absorption of Drugs in Caco-2 Cells

  • Per Artursson
  • Johan Karlsson
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 218)

Abstract

In vitro studies on the intestinal absorption of drugs are usually performed on isolated intestinal segments from various experimental animals (1). The intestinal segments are mounted in Ussing chambers or are alternatively used as everted intestinal sacs or rings (2, 3). The available in vitro models have made it possible to perform relatively detailed studies on intestinal drug transport. However, these models have a number of limitations. Firstly, they are not of human origin. In addition, they are often difficult to perform and only a limited number of experiments can be performed on each occasion. The viability of isolated intestinal segments is also limited which at some occasions reduces the duration of the experiments to only a few minutes (3). However, experiments that extend over a few hours can usually be performed in Ussing chambers.

Keywords

Tight Junction Intestinal Segment Ussing Chamber Paracellular Pathway Copyright Owner 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Per Artursson
    • 1
  • Johan Karlsson
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PharmaceuticsUppsala UniversityUppsalaSweden

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