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Design of Water-To-Cryogen Heat Exchangers with Variable-Thickness Ice Films

  • W. M. Bowers
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering book series (ACRE, volume 16)

Abstract

The use of water to vaporize and superheat cryogens was first described in detail by Williamson and Bartlit [1,2] and by F. W. Bonnett [3]. In early 1964, a 140-kW hot-water-hydrogen vaporizer was put into operation at Rocketdyne’s Santa Susana Field Laboratory. Since then, several such heat exchangers have been built for vaporizing and heating large amounts of cryogens. However, early attempts at designing this type of exchanger for liquid-oxygen service were frustrated because no method of calculating the heat flux through the system was available. At cryogenic temperatures, all heat-transfer properties as well as the ice thickness, when present, must be treated as variables.

Keywords

Heat Flux Heat Exchanger Water Flow Rate Capacity Rate Average Heat Flux 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    K. D. Williamson and J. R. Bartlit, in: Advances in Cryogenic Engineering, Vol. 10, Plenum Press, New York (1965), p. 375.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    K. D. Williamson and J. R. Bartlit, in: Advances in Cryogenic Engineering, Vol. 11, Plenum Press, New York (1966), p. 561.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    F. W. Bonnet, in: Advances in Cryogenic Engineering, Vol. 10, Plenum Press, New York (1965), p. 408.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    J. W. Dean and K. D. Timmerhaus, in: Advances in Cryogenic Engineering, Vol. 8, Plenum Press, New York (1963), p. 263.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Cryogenic Materials Data Handbook, Cryogenic Engineering Laboratory, National Bureau of Standards, Boulder, Colorado, 1961.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    G. M. Dusinberre, Heat Transfer Calculations by Finite Differences, International Textbook Co., Scranton, Pa. (1961), p. 172.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Ibid., pp. 17–18.G. M. Dusinberre, Heat Transfer Calculations by Finite Differences, International Textbook Co., Scranton, Pa. (1961),Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    D. Trebes and J. Gerstley, “Final Report AEA Heat Exchange Injector Study (Phase 3),” Rocketdyne Report HTM 68–8 (Apr. 1968), p. 13. Note: Report, but not data presented herein, is classified Confidential.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1971

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. M. Bowers
    • 1
  1. 1.RocketdyneCanoga ParkUSA

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