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A Superfluid Plug for Space

  • P. M. Selzer
  • W. M. Fairbank
  • C. W. F. Everitt
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering book series (ACRE, volume 16)

Abstract

This experiment is concerned with the problem of containing liquid helium in space. On earth, one maintains cryogenic equipment at 4°K by immersing it in liquid helium and utilizing the latent heat of the liquid to dissipate any heat input. Gravitational phase separation allows the boil-off gas to be withdrawn at the top of the dewar. Two major problems arise in a zero-g environment. First, we no longer may have an open gas-evacuation line because liquid will also be withdrawn. Second, there may not always be enough liquid in contact with the equipment to dissipate the entire heat input; consequently, the temperature of the system will rise.

Keywords

Heat Input Liquid Helium Normal Fluid Poiseuille Equation Porous Plug 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    J. Wilks, The Properties of Liquid and Solid Helium, Clarendon Press, Oxford (1967), p. 36; alsoGoogle Scholar
  2. 1a.
    J. Donnelly, Experimental Superfluidity, University of Chicago Press, Chicago (1967), p. 32.Google Scholar
  3. 2.
    J. Wilks, op. cit., p. 388; or K. R. Atkins, Liquid Helium, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge (1959), p. 159.Google Scholar
  4. 3.
    J. Wilks, op. cit., p. 56.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1971

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. M. Selzer
    • 1
  • W. M. Fairbank
    • 1
  • C. W. F. Everitt
    • 1
  1. 1.Stanford UniversityStanfordUSA

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