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Superconductivity in High-Energy Physics

  • E. G. Pewitt
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering book series (ACRE, volume 16)

Abstract

Applied superconductivity is making a considerable impact on the equipment used in high-energy physics. Many types of magnets are required for research in this area. The use of superconducting magnets in preference to conventional magnets reduces operating costs and offers the possibility of much higher fields more economically than are feasible with conventional techniques. Low-loss superconducting rf cavities should permit the acceleration and separation of beams of elementary particles in a much more efficient and economical way than is possible with conventional room-temperature rf techniques.

Keywords

Bubble Chamber Electron Linear Accelerator Detector Magnet Apply Superconductivity Magnet Technology 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1971

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. G. Pewitt
    • 1
  1. 1.Argonne National LaboratoryArgonneUSA

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