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A Miniature Self-Regulating Rapid-Cooling Joule-Thomson Cryostat

  • J. S. Buller
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering book series (ACRE, volume 16)

Abstract

Miniature Joule-Thomson cryostats were originally developed to cool infrared detectors. Units for this purpose range in size upward from about \( \frac{1}{8} - \)in. diameter and 1-in. length. In the United States, developments starting in the late 1950s produced cryostats having either a rapid-starting capability or an external control system to extend the cooling time.

Keywords

Heat Exchanger Heat Load Nitrogen Flow Rate Heat Leak Tank Pressure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    U.S. Patent 3,269,140, E. W. Peterson and M. J. Nagy, Assignors to Santa Barbara Research Center.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    J. M. Geist and P. K. Lashmet, in: Advances in Cryogenic Engineering, Vol. 5, Plenum Press, New York (1960), p. 324.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    J. M. Geist and P. K. Lashmet, in: Advances in Cryogenic Engineering, Vol. 6, Plenum Press, New York (1961), p. 73.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    R. B. Currie, in: Advances in Cryogenic Engineering, Vol. 12, Plenum Press, New York (1967), p. 557.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    S. W. Stephens, Infrared Physics, 8:25 (1968).CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1971

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. S. Buller
    • 1
  1. 1.Santa Barbara Research CenterGoletaUSA

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