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Giant Retinal Ganglion Cells in Dogfish (Mustelus): Electrophysiology of Single On-Centre Units

  • W. K. Stell
  • P. B. Detwiler
  • H. G. Wagner
  • M. L. Wolbarsht
Part of the NATO Advanced Study Institutes Series book series (NSSA, volume 1)

Abstract

The ganglion cells are the most typical neurons in the vertebrate retina. With their axons they form the only pathway from the retina to the brain. Because their axons are so accessible to electrophysiological study, they are still the best known single units in the retina. Even so, rather little is understood about the cellular structure and synaptic organisation which must account for the variety of functions these cells can perform. Ganglion cells have been shown to generate responses which depend in part on the spatial distribution of the stimulating light on the retina. The region within which light influences the response, called the “receptive field” (RF) by Hartline (1940), typically comprises concentric regions of opposite sign: a centre within which light evokes responses of one type (e.g. firing at ON), and a surround within which light evokes responses of complementary type (firing at OFF). Such cells, described in the cat by Kuffler (1952), were found to undergo changes in surround organisation going from the light- to the dark-adapted state (Barlow et al, 1957).

Keywords

Ganglion Cell Receptive Field Bipolar Cell Amacrine Cell Sensitivity Profile 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1975

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. K. Stell
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • P. B. Detwiler
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • H. G. Wagner
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • M. L. Wolbarsht
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  1. 1.UCLA Medical CenterUSA
  2. 2.National Institutes of HealthUSA
  3. 3.Duke University Medical CenterUSA
  4. 4.Marine Biological LaboratoryUSA

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