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Behavioral Foundations of Adaptation

  • Clifton Lee Gass

Abstract

Maintenance in the face of change is the status quo for most organisms. Remaining adapted requires that behavior be coupled with changes in environments, which may be extremely complex in their patterning or essentially unpredictable; we understand only superficially the processes through which coupling is established and maintained. Here I explore this problem by considering the paradox that animals are both conservative in their behavior, or resilient with regard to changes in their surroundings, and able to track these changes by plastically altering their own behavior. Consideration of these qualities, especially how they interact in the context of various kinds of environments and various patterns of environmental variation, yields useful insights into adaptation and raises fundamental questions about the organization of behaving systems in general.

Keywords

Central Processing Unit Mapping Rule Behavior Program Ecological Psychology Information Processing Capacity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Clifton Lee Gass
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Zoology and Institute of Animal Resource EcologyUniversity of British ColumbiaVancouverCanada

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