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Drug Abuse of Hallucinogenic Plants: Datura Suaveolens

  • Richard C. W. Hall
  • Michael K. Popkin
  • Sondra K. Stickney
  • Earl R. Gardner

Abstract

The abuse of “legally available” hallucinogenic plants in this country is increasing, particularly among adolescents (Hall et al., 1977). Throughout the southeastern United States the use of Angel’s Trumpet (Datura suaveolens) as a legal hallucinogen is becoming a significant problem.

Keywords

Visual Hallucination Psychotic State Widen Pulse Pressure Physostigmine Salicylate Datura Suaveolens 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. Crowell, E.B. 1967. The Treatment of Scopolamine Induced Delirium with Physostigmine. Clin. Pharmacol. Ther., 8: 409–414.Google Scholar
  2. Hall, R.C.W., Popkin, M.K. and McHenry, L.E. 1977. Angel’s Trumpet Psychosis: A Central Nervous System Anticholinergic Syndrome. Am. J. Psych., 134: 3.Google Scholar
  3. Hall, R.C.W., et al. 1977. Psychosis Induced by Datura Suaveolens: Hallucinosis and Anticholinergic Delirium. World J. of Psycho- synth., 9: 3: 19–22.Google Scholar
  4. Kingsbury, J.M. 1974.Poisonous Plants of the U.S. and Canada. Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey: Prentice-Hall, pp. 280–282.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard C. W. Hall
  • Michael K. Popkin
  • Sondra K. Stickney
  • Earl R. Gardner

There are no affiliations available

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