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A Descriptive Study of Drug Use Among the Hearing Impaired in a Senior High School for the Hearing Impaired

  • Reginald Locke
  • Shirley Johnson

Abstract

Deafness as a handicap is difficult to understand or to identify visually because usually there are no physical deformities. Deafness usually is socially identified when the deaf person begins to communicate with a hearing or another deaf person.

Keywords

Substance Abuse Hearing Impair Sign Language Senior High School Substance Abuse Problem 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. Altshuler, Kenneth Z. and Rainer, John D., 1969. Mental Health and the Deaf: Approaches and Prospects, U.S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare. Washington, D.C.Google Scholar
  2. McClure, William J., L.H.D. 1969. Mental Health for the Deaf in the School Setting, U.S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare. Washington, D.C.Google Scholar
  3. Kleinfield, Sonny 1977. The handicapped: Hidden No Longer. The Atlantic Magazine, 240(6).Google Scholar
  4. A Handbook on the Legal Rights of Handicapped People. U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C.Google Scholar
  5. Seilitz, Claire; Johada, Marie; Deutsch, Morton; and Cook, Stuart W. 1959. Research Methods in Social Relations, New York, Chicago, San Francisco, Toronto. Holt, Rinehart, and Winston.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Reginald Locke
    • 1
  • Shirley Johnson
    • 1
  1. 1.Howard UniversityUSA

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