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Winning Over Employers: A Comprehensive Approach to Job Placement with Substance Abusers

  • James C. Gardiner

Abstract

The importance of job placement for rehabilitated substance abusers has been strongly emphasized in the recent literature.. Morton (1976), for example, has stated that “employment must be viewed as an essential final step in his restoration to a socially acceptable role. Without a job, full rehabilitation cannot, in effect, be considered achieved.” One of the obstacles to job placement, however, has been a reluctance on the part of employers to hire recovering addicts or alcoholics. This phenomenon has been documented by Ciota (1973), Goldenberg and Keatinge (1973), Krongel (1973), Randell (1973), Ward (1973) and others. The vocational specialist, therefore, must seek ways to break down prejudicial barriers and convince employers to give ex-abusers an opportunity to work in the “straight”world.

Keywords

Substance Abuser Vocational Rehabilitation Drug Abuser Survival Skill Vocational Specialist 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • James C. Gardiner
    • 1
  1. 1.Bear River Community Mental Health Center Brigham CityUSA

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