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Vocational Services in Nida-Funded Drug Treatment Programs

  • Robert L. Hubbard
  • Henrick Harwood
  • Monte C. Maney
  • S. Lou Mickey
  • Angela Mitchell
  • Judith K. Linn

Abstract

In the past while most drug treatment programs have considered client employment to be an indicator of successful treatment, a review of previous studies indicates few have been able to provide the range of services needed to prepare ex-addicts for employment and to help them secure jobs. Goldenberg (1972) reported that although the drug program personnel, employers and treatment clients surveyed tended to feel that a job was important in rehabilitation, programs were not providing adequate services. Sells (1974) reported less than one of every 20 clients admitted to programs in the first two years of the Drug Abuse Reporting Program (DARP) participated in vocational training outside the programs. The System Sciences, Inc. (1973) evaluation of 24 therapeutic communities reported that only about 15 minutes a day were involved with vocational training and less than 20 minutes a day with jobs outside the program. Burt and Pines (1976) found that only 11 percent of clients in one Washington program participated in job training, referral, placement counseling, or vocational rehabilitation counseling. Less than one in 20 clients in a New York program found vocational rehabilitation or job counseling the most helpful activity (Burt and Glynn, 1976). Although both treatment program staff and clients in one major study (Mandell, Goldschmidt and Grover, 1973) agreed that jobs were important objectives of treatment, less than an hour a week was devoted to finding jobs for clients or preparing clients for employment. From these studies, it is clear that vocational and employment services were not a major element of most treatment programs in the early 1970s.

Keywords

Vocational Rehabilitation Employment Service General Counselor Referral Source Drug Treatment Program 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. Burt, M.R. and Glynn, T.J. 1976.Afollow-up study of former clients of drug treatment programs in Washington D.C, and New York City, (Final Report submitted to NIDA). Bethesda, Maryland: Burt As­sociates, Inc.Google Scholar
  2. Burt, M.R. and Pines, S. 1976.A follow-up study of former clients of the District of Columbia’s Narcotics Treatment Administration. Bethesda, Maryland: Burt Associates, Inc.Google Scholar
  3. Goldenberg, I.I. 1972.Employment and addiction: Perspective on existing business and treatment practices. Washington, D.C.: National Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Labor.Google Scholar
  4. Koenigsberg, L. and Royster, E. 1975. Jobs for drug abuse treatment program clients. Rockville, Md.: National Institute on Drug Abuse.Google Scholar
  5. Mandell, W., Goldschmidt, P.G. and Grover, P. 1973.Interdrug—An evaluation of treatment programs for drug abusers. Baltimore, Maryland: The John Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health.Google Scholar
  6. Mickey, S.L., Linn, J.K. and Hubbard, R.L. 1977.The nature and impact of vocational and employment related services in drug treatment programs. (Vol I: Vocational and employment services in drug treatment programs: An annotated bibliography.) Research Triangle Park, N.C.: Research Triangle Institute.Google Scholar
  7. Sells, S.B. (ed.) 1974. The effectiveness of drug abuse treatment (2 vols.). Cambridge, Mass.: Ballinger Publishing Company.Google Scholar
  8. System Sciences, Inc. 1973.A comparative analysis of 24 therapeutic communities in New York City, funded by the Addiction Services Agency of the City of New York. Bethesda, Maryland: System Sciences, Inc.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert L. Hubbard
    • 1
  • Henrick Harwood
    • 1
  • Monte C. Maney
    • 1
  • S. Lou Mickey
    • 1
  • Angela Mitchell
    • 1
  • Judith K. Linn
    • 1
  1. 1.Research Triangle InstituteUSA

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