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Teaching the Positive Attainment of Altered States of Consciousness as a Prevention and Drug Treatment Approach

  • Diane D. Livingston
  • John A. Heuvelman

Abstract

Altered states of consciousness have perennial roots of concern in psychology, philosophy, religion and the spiritual disciplines (Katz, 1973). The impulse towards altering consciousness, towards transcendence of the world of the everyday and the ordinary, seems rooted in man himself. If transcendence of self is indeed a human need, traditional perspectives on drug abuse populations may warrant a radical revision. This paper presents 58 non-drug induced methods of attaining altered states of consciousness. These methods are to be viewed as a possible alternative therapy to the somewhat unsuccessful conventional approaches that prevail in drug treatment centers today.

Keywords

Garden City Altered State Altered Consciousness Anchor Book Transcendent State 
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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Diane D. Livingston
    • 1
  • John A. Heuvelman
    • 2
  1. 1.West Texas State UniversityUSA
  2. 2.Hope CenterTucson South Behavioral Health ServicesUSA

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