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The PSA Puzzle: Making Media Work

  • David G. Schmeling
  • C. Edward Wotring

Abstract

Hundreds of thousands of dollars have been invested in principally federal and state anti-drug abuse media campaigns since the late sixties. While there are data on the effectiveness of advertising for the public good generally, not a hint of how we were doing in drug public service advertising was available until around 1973. Drug abuse media campaigns were shots in the dark. Some suspect they were at best without intended effect and probably were counterproductive to any rational solution to the problem.

Keywords

Drug Abuse Information Campaign Broadcast Time Social Scene Message Design 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • David G. Schmeling
    • 1
  • C. Edward Wotring
    • 1
  1. 1.Florida Drug Abuse ProgramUSA

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