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Bibliography of the Biological Effects of Static Magnetic Fields

  • Leo Gross

Abstract

Interest in the biological effects of magnetic fields has increased in recent years as evidenced by the growing number of investigators reporting in this area.

Keywords

Magnetic Field Biological Effect Static Magnetic Field Weak Magnetic Field Part Versus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press 1964

Authors and Affiliations

  • Leo Gross
    • 1
  1. 1.Waldemar Medical Research FoundationWoodburyUSA

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