Advertisement

Large Superconducting Solenoid for the Minimag Experiment

  • M. A. Green
Part of the Advances in Cryogenic Engineering book series (ACRE, volume 21)

Abstract

The superconducting magnet described here was to be used as part of a detector for an experiment (MINIMAG) on the electron-positron storage ring and colliding-beam facility (SPEAR II) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator in California. Although the MINIMAG experiment was canceled, the magnet development work was not. The development of superconducting magnets, such as the one described here, is vital for the advance of high-energy physics on colliding-beam machines such as DORIS in Germany, the ISR at CERN in Switzerland, and the proposed PEP machine in the United States.

Keywords

Vacuum Vessel Magnet Coil Radiation Length Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Solenoid Coil 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    M. Alston-Garnjost, A. Barbaro-Galtieri, O. Dahl, P. Eberhard, R. Kenney, A. Litke, G. Lynch, T. Mast, D. Miller, J. Nelson, S. Parker, M. Pripstein, R. Ross, B. Sadoulet, F. Solmitz, M. Stevenson, and D. Young, “A Proposal to Simultaneously Measure Charged Particles and Gamma Rays over a Large Solid Angle at SPEAR II,” Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Proposal (October 15, 1974).Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    M. A. Green, “MINIMAG Experiment, Large Superconducting Solenoid Magnet; A Description of the Magnet and Its Conductor,” Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Engineering Note M4833, UCID 3753 (May 1975).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    M. A. Green, “MINIMAG Experiment, Large Superconducting Solenoid Magnet, The Cryogenic System,” Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Engineering Note M4834, UCID 3754 (June 1975).Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    M. A. Green, “MINIMAG Experiment, Large Superconducting Solenoid Magnet, The Radiation Thickness of the Magnet and Its Cryostat,” Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Engineering Note M4835, UCID 3755 (March 1975).Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    “Materials for Use in Superconducting Magnet Construction” (a report of the GESSS Collaboration; may be obtained from Rutherford High Energy Laboratory, Chilton Didcot, Berkshire, England) GESSS-3 (April 1974).Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    M. A. Green IEEE Trans. Nuclear Science NS-18:669 (1971).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    CERN Courier15(2):36 (1975).Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    M. A. Green and J. D. Taylor, “MINIMAG Experiment, Large Superconducting Solenoid Magnet, The First Small Experimental Magnet,” Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Engineering Note M4836, UCID 3756 (July 1975).Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    P. H. Eberhard, M. A. Green, and J. D. Taylor, “MINIMAG Experiment, Large Superconducting Solenoid Magnet, The Oval Solenoid Test,” Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Engineering Note M4843, UCID 3759 (July 1975).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1960

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. A. Green
    • 1
  1. 1.Lawrence Berkeley LaboratoryUniversity of CaliforniaBerkeleyUSA

Personalised recommendations