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Semiotics in the United States

  • Roberta Kevelson
Part of the Topics in Contemporary Semiotics book series (TICSE)

Abstract

A history of semiotics in the United States or elsewhere is not the same kind of history as that of other academic disciplines. For example, in the social sciences, e.g., anthropology, political science, economics, social psychology, jurisprudence, linguistics, each of these disciplined areas of inquiry can be mapped as a field with certain acknowledged provinces or conceptual universes of discourse. Such basic concepts for economics are supply and demand, exchange, distribution, the market, the dollar, capital, etc. Anthropology recognizes culture, kinship patterns, nonhuman as well as all human organizations for acculturation, and in general investigates all the areas common to the larger domain of social science. Jurisprudence maps out the relationship between theory and practice of law, and speculates on the reciprocity between legal systems and other value systems in society, including customary interpersonal behavior, which is not legally encoded.

Keywords

Semiotic Theory Existential Graph Summer Seminar Peircean Semiotics Semiotic Study 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Roberta Kevelson
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Philosophy, Program for Semiotic Research in Law, Government, and EconomicsPennsylvania State UniversityReadingUSA

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