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A Tribute to R. W. Salt

  • Richard A. Ring
  • Paul W. Riegert

Abstract

Reginald W. Salt was born in Leicestershire, England, in 1910, arrived with his family in Calgary, Alberta, Canada the following year, and has remained in that province ever since. Like his older brother George, he developed a keen interest in insects at an early age, an avocation that he pursued throughout his formative years, ending with a B.Sc. degree in Entomology from the University of Alberta in 1930. Following graduation he applied for a job with the federal Entomological Branch, was hired immediately, and was assigned to work at the Dominion Entomological Laboratory at Lethbridge, Alberta. Here he got his first taste of economic entomology. The pale western cutworm (Agrotis orthogonia) was the prime pest of field crops and, along with the wheat stem sawfly (Cephus cinctus), it provided the young scientist with ample opportunity to learn how noxious insects affect the economy. Not only did he have the opportunity to investigate the life cycles and behavioral traits of these insects, but he also learned how difficult it is to control a well-established pest.

Keywords

Colorado Potato Beetle Freezing Process Cold Hardiness Subzero Temperature Montana State College 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Chapman and Hall 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard A. Ring
  • Paul W. Riegert

There are no affiliations available

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