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Acute Hormonal Regulation of Lipolysis and Steroidogenesis

  • S. J. Yeaman
  • S. R. Cordle
  • R. J. Colbran
  • A. J. Garton
  • R. C. Honnor
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 135)

Abstract

Adipose tissue triacylglycerol is the major energy store within the body, with approximately 90% of energy reserves being stored in this form. Triacylglycerol accumulates in highly-specialised adipocytes where it occupies the bulk of the intracellular space. Not surprisingly the synthesis and mobilisation of triacylglycerol is under acute hormonal and neural control. Adipose tissue is subject to sympathetic innervation, with catecholamine, (primarily noradrenaline), released from the nerve endings acting as a potent lipolytic agent. Circulating hormones which have lipolytic actions include adrenaline, ACTH and glucagon, whilst the major antilipolytic hormone is insulin, with other agents such as adenosine and nicotinic acid also having antilipolytic effects.

Keywords

Cholesterol Ester Sterol Carrier Protein Cholesterol Ester Hydrolase Bovine Adrenal Cortex Activatable Cholesterol Ester Hydrolase 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. J. Yeaman
    • 1
  • S. R. Cordle
    • 1
  • R. J. Colbran
    • 1
  • A. J. Garton
    • 1
  • R. C. Honnor
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of BiochemistryUniversity of NewcastleNewcastle upon TyneUK

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