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Abstract

Several years ago, during a study of phase separation in glasses, we detected with the aid of electron microscopy and low-angle x-ray scattering the possibility of formation of some kind of highly disperse structure together with the main phases [1]. Three hypotheses have been put forward on the origin of this “fine” structure: that it is fluctuational in character [2], that a special kind of phase separation, described as “microphase separation,” exists [3], and that it is formed during quenching of the glass to room temperature, as the result of supersaturation of the phases followed by secondary separation in it [4]„ Somewhat later Tran Thach-Lan [5], investigating phase separation in sodium silicate glasses, found that each phase is homogeneous; i.e., he did not detect a “fine” structure. At the present time there are no doubts regarding the existence of this structure or the causes of its formation [6, 7]. It is described as a “background structure” in [7], but in our opinion it is more correct to speak of “secondary separation,” as this stresses its origin.

Keywords

Binodal Curve Secondary Origin Lithium Silicate Sodium Borosilicate Glass Secondary Separation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Literature Cited

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Copyright information

© Consultants Bureau, New York 1973

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. A. Porai-Koshits
  • V. I. Aver’yanov

There are no affiliations available

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