Life Safety Concerns

  • Frederick S. Merritt
  • James Ambrose

Abstract

Buildings must be designed for both normal and emergency conditions. Building designers should, in initial design of buildings, take precautions to protect property from major damage, and especially from collapse, due to accidents or disasters; but designers must also provide for life safety of occupants, neighbors and passersby in emergency situations. Such situations may be caused by high winds, earthquake, intruders or fire. Cost-effective protection against their adverse effects can be achieved with the systems-design approach, applied from the start of conceptual design.

Keywords

Combustion Clay Foam Diesel Ductility 

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References

  1. American National Standard Minimum Design Loads for Buildings and Other StructuresAmerican National Standards Institute, 1982.Google Scholar
  2. Uniform Building Code, International Conference of Building Officials, 1988.Google Scholar
  3. Standard Building Code, Southern Building Code Congress International, 1988.Google Scholar
  4. J. Ambrose and D. Vergun, Design for Lateral Forces, Wiley, 1987.Google Scholar
  5. C. Arnold and R. Reitherman, Building Configuration and Seismic Design, Wiley, 1982Google Scholar

References

  1. Uniform Building Code, International Conference of Building Officials, 1988.Google Scholar
  2. Standard Building Code, Southern Building Code Congress International, 1988.Google Scholar
  3. Life Safety Code, National Fire Protection Association, 1988.Google Scholar
  4. Fire Protection Handbook, NFPAGoogle Scholar

References

  1. P. Hopf, Handbook of Building Security Planning and Design, McGraw-Hill, 1979.Google Scholar
  2. P. Hopf and J. Raeber, Access for the Handicapped, Van Nostrand Reinhold, 1984.Google Scholar
  3. M. Valins, Housing for Elderly People, Van Nostrand Reinhold, 1987.Google Scholar
  4. Specifications for Making Buildings and Facilities Accessible to and Usuable by the Physically Handicapped, ANSI A117.1, American National Standards Institute, New York.Google Scholar

General References and Sources for Additional Study

  1. American National Standard Minimum Design Loads for Buildings and Other Structures, ANSI A58.1–1982, American National Standards Institute, New York, 1982.Google Scholar
  2. Uniform Building Code, International Conference of Building Officials, Whittier, CA, 1988 (new editions every three years).Google Scholar
  3. Standard Building Code, Southern Building Code Congress International, Birmingham, AL.Google Scholar
  4. Life Safety Code, NFPA 101, National Fire Protection Association, Quincy, MA, 1988.Google Scholar
  5. J. Lathrop, Life Safety Code Handbook, National Fire Protection Association, Quincy, MA, 1988.Google Scholar
  6. J. Ambrose and D. Vergun, Design for Lateral Forces, Wiley, New York, 1987.Google Scholar
  7. P. Hopf, Handbook of Building Security Planning and Design, McGraw-Hill, New York, 1979.Google Scholar
  8. P. Hopf and J. Raeber, Access for the Handicapped, Van Nostrand Reinhold, New York, 1984.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Van Nostrand Reinhold 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Frederick S. Merritt
    • 1
  • James Ambrose
    • 2
  1. 1.West Palm BeachUSA
  2. 2.University of Southern CaliforniaUSA

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