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Systems for Enclosing Buildings

  • Frederick S. Merritt
  • James Ambrose

Abstract

Buildings are given an enclosure around their exterior so that the desired internal environment can be maintained while outside weather is excluded. Traditionally, the exterior enclosure consists of vertical walls and a roof, either of which may be punctured by such building components as doors, windows and ventilators, for access, light or ventilation. Other alternatives, though, are possible and have been used, such as a barrel arch or a dome, integrating walls and roof. Thus, a roof system and a wall system may be separate systems, physically independent of each other, or indistinguishable parts of a single enclosure system.

Keywords

Sandwich Panel Exterior Wall Building Engineering Expansion Joint Unit Masonry 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. Sweet’s Architectural File, Division 7: Roofing, McGraw-Hill, New York, latest edition.Google Scholar
  2. Also see general references for this chapter.Google Scholar

References

  1. H. Sands, Wall Systems: Analysis by Detail, McGraw-Hill, New York, 1986.Google Scholar
  2. Sweet’s Architectural File, Divisions 7 (sealants, weath- erproofing) and 9 (finishes), McGraw Hill, New York, (issued annually).Google Scholar
  3. Building Code Requirements for Reinforced Concrete, ACI 318–83, American Concrete Institute, Detroit, 1983.Google Scholar
  4. Building Code Requirements for Engineered Brick Masonry, Brick Institute of America, Washington, D.C.Google Scholar
  5. J. Amrhein, Masonry Design Manual, 3rd ed.. Masonry Institute of America, Los Angeles, 1979.Google Scholar
  6. Also see general references for this chapter.Google Scholar

References

  1. Sweet’s Architectural File, Division 7 (doors, windows, sealants, weatherproofing), McGraw-Hill, New York (updated yearly).Google Scholar
  2. D. Watson, Construction Materials and Practices, 3rd ed., McGraw-Hill, New York, 1986.Google Scholar
  3. Also see general references for this chapter.Google Scholar

General References and Sources for Additional Study

  1. F. Merritt, Building Design and Construction Handbook, 4th ed., McGraw-Hill, New York, 1982.Google Scholar
  2. C. Ramsey and H. Sleeper, Architectural Graphic Standards, 8th ed., Wiley, New York, 1988.Google Scholar
  3. D. Watson, Construction Materials and Practices, 3rd ed., McGraw-Hill, New York, 1986.Google Scholar
  4. E. Allen, Fundamentals of Building Construction: Materials and Methods, Wiley, New York, 1985.Google Scholar
  5. A. Dietz, Dwelling House Construction, 4th ed., MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, 1974.Google Scholar
  6. H. Olin et al., Construction Principles, Materials, and Methods, 5th ed.. The Institute of Financial Education, Chicago, 1983.Google Scholar
  7. H. Sands, Wall Systems: Analysis by Detail, McGraw-Hill, New York, 1986.Google Scholar
  8. Sweet’s Architectural File, McGraw-Hill, New York (issued annually).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Van Nostrand Reinhold 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Frederick S. Merritt
    • 1
  • James Ambrose
    • 2
  1. 1.West Palm BeachUSA
  2. 2.University of Southern CaliforniaUSA

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