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New insights into the genetics of human ovarian epithelial tumor development

  • S. Zweizig
  • J. Zheng
  • M. Wan
  • T. M. Kim
  • M. Velicescu
  • J. Gosewehr
  • L. Dubeau

Abstract

Much progress was made during the last decade toward the identification and characterization of several of the genetic determinants of carcinogenesis. The actual mechanisms of tumorigenesis remain largely unknown in spite of these advances. Much of the difficulty comes from the complexity of the neoplastic phenotype itself. Indeed, this phenotype is not characterized by single, but by multiple abnormalities which can each vary in importance in individual tumors. Examples of different manifestations of the neoplastic phenotype include uncontrolled growth, ability to destructively infiltrate neighboring tissues, ability to metastasize to distant organs, aberrant cell differentiation, etc. It is likely that these properties are independent of each other and are therefore under separate genetic controls, as not all are present at the same time in individual tumors. The complexity of the problem is further increased by the fact that according to the concept of tumor progression first advanced by Foulds [1] and No well [2], neoplastic cells are not stable but in constant evolution, resulting in high degrees of heterogeneity within a given tumor mass.

Keywords

Ovarian Carcinoma Repeat Polymorphism High Histologic Grade Allelic Deletion Metastatic Ability 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Chapman & Hall 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Zweizig
  • J. Zheng
  • M. Wan
  • T. M. Kim
  • M. Velicescu
  • J. Gosewehr
  • L. Dubeau

There are no affiliations available

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