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Dynamic Computed Tomography for the Heart

  • Y. Tateno
  • Y. Umegaki
  • G. Uchiyama
  • Y. Masuda

Abstract

Real-time computed tomography (CT) of the heart is a subject of great potential importance (Iinuma, 1977). Real-time images of the cardiac ventricles could be used to evaluate stroke volume (Miller, 1977) and ejection fraction. Real-time images of the heart muscle could be used to detect damaged tissues and, presumably, show edematous and necrotic regions (Adams, 1976). Moreover, sufficiently fast scanners in combination with contrast media injections could enable one to get time-concentration curves in the myocardium which provide a measure of regional perfusion.

Keywords

Compute Tomography Image Cardiac Compute Tomography Dynamic Compute Tomography Dynamic Scanner Cardiac Compute Tomography Image 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. Adams, D. F., “Computed Tomography of the Normal and Infarcted Myocardium” Am. J. Roentgenol. 126:786 (1976).Google Scholar
  2. Iinuma, T. A., “Proposed Systems for Ultrafast Computed Tomography,” J. Computer-Assisted Tomography 1:494 (1977).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Miller, S. W.,“Right and Left Ventricular Volumes and Wall Measurements: Determination by Computed Tomography in Arrested Canine Hearts,” Am. J. Roentgenol. 129:257 (1977).Google Scholar
  4. Tateno, Y., “Low-Dosage X-Ray Imaging System Employing Flying Spot X-Ray Microbeam,” Radiol. 121:189 (1976).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Y. Tateno
    • 1
  • Y. Umegaki
    • 1
  • G. Uchiyama
    • 1
  • Y. Masuda
    • 1
  1. 1.National Institute of Radiological Sciences and Chiba University HospitalChibaJapan

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