Flammability Evaluation Methods for Textiles

  • John F. Krasny

Abstract

This chapter will discuss flammability evaluation of fabrics as well as of end-use items containing fabrics, such as apparel, curtains and draperies, tents, mattresses, upholstered furniture, etc.

Keywords

Cellulose Total Heat Gasoline Vinyl Polypropylene 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • John F. Krasny
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Fire ResearchNational Bureau of StandardsUSA

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