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The Flame Retardation of Polyolefins

  • Joseph Green

Abstract

Polyolefins are flammable and will burn in air with a very hot and clean flame accompanied by melting and dripping like a candle. Essentially no soot is developed in the flame, as normally obtained during the burning of aromatic polymers, and little to no residual char is formed. The present state-of-the-art in polyolefin flame retardation dictates the use of halogen-containing compounds whose effectiveness is enhanced by the use of antimony oxide as a Synergist.

Keywords

Oxygen Index Antimony Oxide Zinc Borate Flame Retardation Calcine Clay 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joseph Green
    • 1
  1. 1.Chemical Research and Development CenterFMC CorporationPrincetonUSA

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