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Abstract

Production of ammonium sulfate fertilizer via synthetic ammonia was a national project in Japan just after World War II, and water electrolysis as the source of hydrogen was active. For producting 1 ton of ammonia, 2, 100 Nm3 of hydrogen and 700 Nm3 of nitrogen are required, as shown in Table 5.1.(1) Of these, relatively cheap nitrogen can be supplied by means of air liquefaction, and hence the manufacturing cost of ammonia depends largely on the price of hydrogen.

Keywords

Cell Voltage Heavy Water Water Electrolysis Electrolytic Hydrogen Norsk Hydro 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Fumio Hine
    • 1
  1. 1.Nagoya Institute of TechnologyNagoyaJapan

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