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Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

  • F. H. Field

Abstract

Chemical ionization mass spectrometry is a technique of mass spectrometry wherein the ionization of the substance of interest is effected by ion-molecule reactions rather than by electron impact, photon impact, or field ionization. The spectrum of a substance produced by chemical ionization is different from the spectra produced by the other ionization techniques, and the characteristic aspects of the chemical ionization spectrum are of analytical value and also of value in providing information about the ionic chemistry of the substance under investigation. Preliminary reviews of chemical ionization have been published.(1,2) The characteristic feature of the chemical ionization concept may be looked upon as the utilization of a specific set of ions to effect a specific type of ion-molecule reaction with a wide variety of different compounds. The ions produced by these ion-molecule reactions with a given compound constitute the chemical ionization mass spectrum of the compound. The number of ion types in a set of reactant ions is generally small. Because the same reactant ions react with variety of different compounds, the chemical ionization mass spectra produced from the different compounds are comparable with each other and reflect differences in structure and chemical reactivities or quantitative differences in concentration. In this regard, chemical ionization is quite analogous to the other modes of ionization such as electron impact.

Keywords

Chemical Ionization Ionization Chamber Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry Benzyl Acetate Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrum 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1972

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. H. Field
    • 1
  1. 1.Rockefeller UniversityNew YorkUSA

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