Advertisement

Abstract

From the earliest days of mass spectrometry, evidence was found for the occurrence of secondary processes and these were generally agreed to result from collisions between ions and neutral species. An ion at m/e = 3 was observed by Dempster(1) in 1916 and was correctly identified as H3 +. By 1925, the reaction leading to its formation was well established as (2,3)
$$ H_2^ + + {H_2} \to H_3^ + + H $$
(1)
In addition, the HeH+ ion had been observed in mixtures of hydrogen and helium.(3) In 1928, Hogness and Harkness(4) reported reactions of both positive and negative ions in iodine showing that I2 + was formed both by electron impact and by charge exchange from I+ and that I3 + arose by the reaction
$$ I_2^ + + {I_2} \to I_3^ + + I $$
(2)
The only primary negative ion observed was I-, which underwent charge exchange with I2 so that I2 - was formed by the reaction
$$ {I^ - } + {I_2} \to I_2^ - + I $$
(3)
Further, I3 - was formed by the reaction
$$ I_2^ - + {I_2} \to I_3^ - + I $$
(4)

Keywords

American Chemical Society Bond Dissociation Energy Primary Mass Collision Reaction Appearance Potential 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    A. J. Dempster, Phil. Mag. 31, 438 (1916).Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    H. D. Smyth, Phys. Rev. 25, 452 (1925).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    T. R. Hogness and E. G. Lunn, Phys. Rev. 26, 44 (1925).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    T. R. Hogness and R. W. Harkness, Phys. Rev. 32, 784 (1928).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    H.D. Smyth, Rev. Mod. Phys. 3, 347 (1931).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    J.J. Thomson, “Rays of Positive Electricity,” Longmans Green, London (1933).Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    H. Eyring, J.O. Hirschfelder, and H.S. Taylor, J. Chem. Phys. 4, 479 (1936).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    M.M. Mann, A. Hustrulid, and J.T. Tate, Phys. Rev. 58, 340 (1940).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    V.L. Tal’roze and A.K. Lyubimova, Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR 86, 909 (1952).Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    D.P. Stevenson and D.O. Schissler, J. Chem. Phys. 23, 1353 (1955).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    F.H. Field, J.L. Franklin, and F.W. Lampe, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 79, 2419 (1957).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    F.W. Lampe, F.H. Field, and J.L. Franklin, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 79, 6132 (1957).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    D.O. Schissler and D.P. Stevenson, J. Chem. Phys. 24, 926 (1956).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    F.H. Field, J.L. Franklin, and F.W. Lampe, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 79, 2665 (1957).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    J.A. Hornbeck and J.P. Molnar, Phys. Rev. 84, 621 (1951).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    V.L. Tal’roze and E.L. Frankevich, Zh. Fiz. Khim. 34, 2709 (1960).Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    C. E. Melton and P.S. Rudolph, J. Chem. Phys. 32, 1128 (1960).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. 18.
    F.H. Field, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 83, 1523 (1961).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. 19.
    M.S.B. Munson and F.H. Field, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 88, 2621 (1966).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. 20.
    P. Kebarle, in “Mass Spectrometry in Inorganic Chemistry,” (Advantages in Chemistry Series, No. 72), pp. 24–47, American Chemical Society, Washington, D.C. (1968).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. 21.
    F.H. Field and F.W. Lampe, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 80, 5587 (1958).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. 22.
    M.S.B. Munson, J.L. Franklin, and F.H. Field, J. Phys. Chem. 68, 3098 (1964).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. 23.
    F.C. Fehsenfeld, A.L. Schmeltekopf, P.D. Goldan, H.I. Schiff, and E.E. Ferguson, J. Chem. Phys. 44, 4087 (1966);CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. 23a.
    P.D. Goldan, A.L. Schmeltekopf, F.C. Fehsenfeld, H.I. Schiff, and E.E. Ferguson, J. Chem. Phys. 44, 4095 (1966).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. 24.
    E.W. McDaniel, D.W. Martin, and W.S. Barnes, Rev. Sci. Instr. 33, 2 (1962).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. 25.
    K.B. McAfee and D. Edelson, Proc. Phys. Soc. (London) 81, 382 (1963).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. 26.
    D. Wobschall, J.R. Graham, and D.P. Malone, Phys. Rev. 131, 1565 (1963).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. 27.
    L.R. Anders, J.L. Beauchamp, R.C. Dunbar, and J.D. Baldeschwieler, J. Chem. Phys. 45, 1062 (1966).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. 28a.
    E. Lindholm, Z. Naturforsch. 9a, 535 (1954).Google Scholar
  30. 28b.
    E. Lindholm, in “Ion-Molecule Reactions in Gases” (Advances in Chemistry Series, No. 58, P.J. Ausloos, ed.), pp. 1–19, American Chemical Society, Washington, D.C. (1966).Google Scholar
  31. 29.
    G.K. Lavrovskaya, M.I. Markin, and V.L. Tal’roze, Kinetika i Kataliz 2(1), 21 (1961).Google Scholar
  32. 30.
    E.R. Weiner, G.R. Hertel, and W.S. Koski, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 86, 788 (1964).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. 31.
    G.F. Giese and W.B. Maier, J. Chem. Phys. 39, 739 (1963).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. 32.
    J.H. Futrell and C.D. Miller, Rev. Sci. Instr. 37, 1521 (1966).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. 33.
    A. Henglein, K. Lacmann, and B. Knoll, Ber. Bunsenges. Phys. Chem. 69, 279 (1965).Google Scholar
  36. 34.
    R. L. Champion, L. D. Doverspike, and T. L. Bailey, J. Chem. Phys. 45, 4377, 4385 (1966).Google Scholar
  37. 35.
    Z. Herman, J. Kerstetter, T.L. Rose, and R. Wolfgang, J. Chem. Phys. 46, 2844 (1967);CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  38. 35a.
    Z. Herman, J. Kerstetter, T.L. Rose, and R. Wolfgang, Disc. Faraday Soc. 44, 123 (1967).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  39. 36.
    Z. Herman, J. Kerstetter, T.L. Rose, and R. Wolfgang, Rev. Sci. Instr. 40, 538 (1969).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  40. 37.
    G.G. Meisels, W.H. Hamill, and R. R. Williams, J. Phys. Chem. 61, 1456 (1957);CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  41. 37a.
    G.G. Meisels, W.H. Hamill, and R. R. Williams, J. Chem. Phys. 25, 790 (1956).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  42. 38.
    F.W. Lampe, Radiation Research 10, 691 (1959);CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  43. 38a.
    F.W. Lampe, J. Amer. Chem. Soc. 82, 1551 (1960).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  44. 39.
    J.H. Futrell, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 81, 5921 (1959).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  45. 40.
    S.O. Thompson and D. A. Schaeffer, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 80, 553 (1958);CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  46. 40a.
    S.O. Thompson and D. A. Schaeffer, Radiation Research 10, 671 (1959).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  47. 41.
    K.E. Shuler (ed.), “Ionization in High-Temperature Gases,” Academic Press, New York (1963).Google Scholar
  48. 42.
    P.F. Knewstubb, in “Mass Spectrometry of Organic Ions,” (F.W. McLafferty, ed.), p. 255, Academic Press, New York (1963);Google Scholar
  49. 42a.
    M. M. Shahin, in “Ion-Molecule Reactions in Gases” (Advances in Chemistry Series, No. 58, P.J. Ausloos, ed.), p. 315, American Chemical Society, Washington, D.C. (1966);Google Scholar
  50. 42b.
    S.A. Studniarz and J.L. Franklin, J. Chem. Phys. 49, 2652 (1968).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  51. 43.
    F.H. Field and J.L. Franklin, Electron Impact Phenomena, Academic Press, New York (1957).Google Scholar
  52. 44.
    H.M. Rosenstock, U.S. Atomic Energy Commission Report JLI-650–3-TID-4500 (1959).Google Scholar
  53. 45.
    J. Durup, “Les reactions entre ions positifs et molecules en phase gazeuz,” Gauthier-Villars, Paris (1960).Google Scholar
  54. 46.
    F.W. Lampe, J. L. Franklin, and F. H. Field, in “Progress in Reaction Kinetics,” (G. Porter, ed.), p. 69, Pergamon Press, New York (1961).Google Scholar
  55. 47.
    M. Pahl, Ergeb. Exact. Naturw. 34, 182 (1962).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  56. 48.
    V.L. Tal’roze, Pure Appl. Chem. 5, 455 (1962).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  57. 49.
    D. P. Stevenson, in “Mass Spectrometry” (C. A. McDowell, ed.), p. 589, McGraw-Hill, New York (1963).Google Scholar
  58. 50.
    C.E. Melton, in “Mass Spectrometry of Organic Ions” (F.W. McLafferty, ed.), p. 65, Academic Press, New York (1963).Google Scholar
  59. 51.
    M.J. Henchman, Ann. Rev. 62, 39 (1965).Google Scholar
  60. 52.
    P.J. Ausloos (ed.), “Ion-Molecule Reactions in Gases” (Advances in Chemistry Series, No. 58), American Chemical Society, Washington, D.C. (1966).Google Scholar
  61. 53.
    V. L. Tal’roze and G. V. Karachevtsev, in “Advances in Mass Spectrometry” (W. L. Mead, ed.), Vol. III, p. 211, The Institute of Petroleum, London (1966).Google Scholar
  62. 54.
    E.W. McDaniel, V. Čermák, A. Dalgarno, E.E. Ferguson, and L. Friedman, “Ion-Molecule Reactions,” Wiley-Interscience, New York (1970).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1972

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. L. Franklin
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of ChemistryRice UniversityHoustonUSA

Personalised recommendations