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Pancreatic Response to Dietary Trypsin Inhibitor: Variations Among Species

  • Barbara O. Schneeman
  • Daniel Gallaher
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 199)

Abstract

Inhibitors of proteolytic enzymes are distributed throughout various foods used for human consumption as well as throughout animal feeds. These inhibitors are predominately found in plant foodstuffs and have been associated with the lower protein digestibility of untreated or unprocessed plants used as dietary sources of protein. Because of the importance of plants for human foods as well as their importance in animal feeds, the metabolic and nutritional effects of protease inhibitors have been investigated in a variety of animal species. Most of this research has dealt with the inhibitors of trypsin and chymotrypsin that are found in soybeans. The objective of this paper is to critically examine the variability among species in the response to diets which contain trypsin inhibitors.

Keywords

Trypsin Inhibitor Human Pancreas Pancreatic Enzyme Secretion Inhibitor Feeding Pancreatic Weight 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Barbara O. Schneeman
    • 1
    • 2
  • Daniel Gallaher
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of NutritionUniversity of CaliforniaDavisUSA
  2. 2.Department of Foods and NutritionNorth Dakota State UniversityFargoUSA

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