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Adaptation to Hypoxia in Artemia

  • W. Decleir
  • G. Wolf
  • B. De Wachter
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 174)

Abstract

The genus Artemia has diversified to inhabit ecological niches characterized by high salinity and high temperatures. Both of these abiotic environmental factors contribute to a third ecological characteristic of Artemia habitats, i.e. low oxygen content. Unfortunately precise data of partial oxygen pressures during the day and night and/or seasonal cycles of the different natural Artemia habitats are extremely scarce. One important reason for this is the technical problems of measuring the O2 — content of high salinity waters.

Keywords

Partial Oxygen Pressure Brine Shrimp Environmental Oxygen Organic Phosphate Lower Oxygen Tension 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. Decleir
    • 1
  • G. Wolf
    • 1
  • B. De Wachter
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory of Biochemistry and General ZoologyUniversity of Antwerp (R.U.C.A.)AntwerpBelgium

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