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The Equilibrium Melting Temperature and Surface Free Energy of Polyethylene Single Crystals

  • H. E. Bair
  • T. W. Huseby
  • R. Salovey

Abstract

Chain folded polyethylene single crystals grown from dilute solutions at undercoolings of 20–40°C are metastable. It is well known that under certain conditions the crystals begin to thicken rapidly at elevated tempera-tures.1, 2, 3 In fusion studies of polyethylene in our laboratory, the observed melting temperature of solution grown crystals (where the crystallization temperature is 77°C or lower) has been found to increase by nearly 10°C as a result of thickening while the crystals were being heated at 10°c/min. Thus, it was impossible to correlate the melting results with structural data which had been obtained on the original crystals prior to heating.

Keywords

Crystallization Temperature Surface Free Energy Lower Temperature Peak Equilibrium Melting Temperature Irradiate Crystal 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press 1968

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. E. Bair
    • 1
  • T. W. Huseby
    • 1
  • R. Salovey
    • 1
  1. 1.Bell Telephone Laboratories, IncorporatedMurray HillUSA

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