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Calorimetric Measurements on Metal Sulfates and Their Hydrates: Electrode Potentials and Thermodynamic Data for Aqueous Ions of Transition Elements

  • John W. Larson
  • Loren G. Hepler
Conference paper

Abstract

Knowledge of reversible electrode potentials is important for many aspects of analytical electrochemistry, and also as a source of thermo-dynamic data that are finding increasing applications in analytical chemistry. Unfortunately, there are substantial experimental difficulties associated with determination of reversible electrode potentials for metals that are very reactive and for ill-behaving metals that often yield “irreversible” electrodes. Many years ago, Lewis developed and applied indirect electrochemical methods for determination of the potentials for such active metals as sodium in aqueous systems. Subsequently, Latimer and others have applied thermodynamic data to calculation of aqueous potentials for aluminum, fluorine, etc.

Keywords

Thermodynamic Data Ferrous Sulfate Calorimetric Measurement Total Uncertainty Equilibrium Measurement 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press 1968

Authors and Affiliations

  • John W. Larson
    • 1
    • 2
  • Loren G. Hepler
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Departments of ChemistryCarnegie-Mellon UniversityPittsburghUSA
  2. 2.University of LouisvilleLouisvilleUSA

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