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Selecting Sawn-Timber Compression and Tension Members

  • Judith J. Stalnaker
  • Ernest C. Harris
Part of the VNR Structural Engineering Series book series (VNRSES)

Abstract

Columns are generally thought of as the vertical supporting members of buildings. However, there are other structural members that act as columns—the piers of a bridge or the compression chord of a truss, for example. Generally columns are compression members, but they can also have combined compression and bending or can even have tensile axial force under loading that causes uplift. For purposes of design, we define a column as a structural member whose primary loads are axial compression.

Keywords

Slenderness Ratio Allowable Stress Snow Load Allowable Load Tension Member 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Judith J. Stalnaker
    • 1
  • Ernest C. Harris
    • 1
  1. 1.University of Colorado at DenverDenverUSA

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