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Loads and Allowable Stresses

  • Judith J. Stalnaker
  • Ernest C. Harris
Part of the VNR Structural Engineering Series book series (VNRSES)

Abstract

This chapter is in two parts. Part I deals with loads—the forces to which timber structures may be subjected. It concerns the sources of these loads and shows how to compute their magnitudes. Part II covers the method code writers use to establish allowable stresses and shows how the structural designer selects and modifies those allowables to design by the service load method.

Keywords

Wind Load Wind Force Dead Load Live Load Design Load 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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    National Design Specification for Wood Construction, National Forest Products Association, Washington, DC, 1986.Google Scholar
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    Uniform Building Code,International Conference of Building Officials, Whittier, CA, 1985.Google Scholar
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    Standard Methods of Testing Small Clear Specimens of Timber,D143–52 (1978), American Society for Testing and Materials, Philadelphia, PA.Google Scholar
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    Hendrickson, E. M., and B. Ellingwood, “Limit State Probabilities for Wood Structural Members,” Journal of Structural Engineering, American Society of Civil Engineers, 113(1), Jan. 1987, pp. 88–106.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Judith J. Stalnaker
    • 1
  • Ernest C. Harris
    • 1
  1. 1.University of Colorado at DenverDenverUSA

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