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Wood Structure and Properties

  • Judith J. Stalnaker
  • Ernest C. Harris
Part of the VNR Structural Engineering Series book series (VNRSES)

Abstract

For structural applications, wood is most commonly found as either sawn timbers, lumber, or glued laminated members (glulams). In the interest of economy and to permit using wood more efficiently, increasing amounts of wood today find their way into manufactured structural materials or members such as (1) plywood, hardboard, chipboard, flakeboard, waferboard, and plastic/wood laminates (these are known collectively as wood composites); and (2) manufactured members such as plywood-lumber beams or wood trusses. Many of these will be discussed later in this book.

Keywords

Moisture Content Annual Ring Compression Wood Wood Structure Tertiary Creep 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Judith J. Stalnaker
    • 1
  • Ernest C. Harris
    • 1
  1. 1.University of Colorado at DenverDenverUSA

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