Microwave Power Tubes

  • Jerry C. Whitaker

Abstract

Microwave power tubes span a wide range of applications, operating at frequencies from 300 MHz to 300 GHz with output powers from a few hundred watts to more than 10 MW. Applications range from the familiar to the exotic. The following devices are included under the general description of microwave power tubes:
  • Klystron, including the reflex and multicavity klystron

  • Multistage depressed collector (MSDC) klystron

  • Klystrode (IOT) tube

  • Traveling wave tube (TWT)

  • Crossed-field tube

  • Coaxial magnetron

  • Gyrotron

  • Planar triode

  • High-frequency tetrode

Keywords

Drift Tube Resonant Cavity Drive Power Beam Voltage Output Cavity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Bibliography

  1. Badger, George, “The Klystrode: A New High-Efficiency UHF-TV Power Amplifier,” Proceedings of the NAB Engineering Conference, National Association of Broadcasters, Washington, DC, 1986.Google Scholar
  2. Clayworth, G. T., H. P. Bohlen, and R. Heppinstall, “Some Exciting Adventures in the IOT Business,” NAB 1992 Broadcast Engineering Conference Proceedings, National Association of Broadcasters, Washington, DC, pp. 200–208, 1992.Google Scholar
  3. Collins, G. B., Radar System Engineering, McGraw-Hill, New York, 1947.Google Scholar
  4. Crutchfield, E. B., NAB Engineering Handbook, 8th Ed., National Association of Broadcasters, Washington, DC, 1992.Google Scholar
  5. Dick, Bradley, “New Developments in RF Technology,” Broadcast Engineering, Intertec Publishing, Overland Park, KS, May 1986.Google Scholar
  6. Fink, D., and D. Christiansen (eds.), Electronics Engineers’ Handbook, 3rd Ed., McGraw-Hill, New York, 1989.Google Scholar
  7. Fisk, J. B., H. D. Hagstrum, and P. L. Hartman, “The Magnetron As a Generator of Centimeter Waves,” Bell System Tech J., Vol. 25, pg. 167, April 1946.Google Scholar
  8. Ginzton, E. L., and A. E. Harrison, “Reflex Klystron Oscillators,” Proc. IRE, Vol. 34, pg. 97, March 1946.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. IEEE Standard Dictionary of Electrical and Electronics Terms, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc., New York, 1984.Google Scholar
  10. Integral Cavity Klystrons for UHF-TV Transmitters, Varian Associates, Palo Alto, CA.Google Scholar
  11. McCune, Earl, “Final Report: The Multi-Stage Depressed Collector Project,” Proceedings of the NAB Engineering Conference, National Association of Broadcasters, Washington, DC, 1988.Google Scholar
  12. Ostroff, N., A. Kiesel, A. Whiteside, and A. See, “Klystrode-Equipped UHF-TV Transmitters: Report on the Initial Full Service Station Installations,” Proceedings of the NAB Engineering Conference, National Association of Broadcasters, Washington, DC, 1989.Google Scholar
  13. Ostroff, N., A. Whiteside, A. See, and A. Kiesel, “A 120 kW Klystrode Transmitter for Full Broadcast Service,” Proceedings of the NAB Engineering Conference, National Association of Broadcasters, Washington, DC, 1988.Google Scholar
  14. Ostroff, N., A. Whiteside, and L. Howard, “An Integrated Exciter/Pulser System for Ultra High-Efficiency Klystron Operation,” Proceedings of the NAB Engineering Conference, National Association of Broadcasters, Washington, DC, 1985.Google Scholar
  15. Pierce, J. R., “Reflex Oscillators,” Proc. IRE, Vol. 33, pg. 112, February 1945.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Pierce, J. R., “Theory of the Beam-Type Traveling Wave Tube,” Proc. IRE, Vol. 35, pg. 111, February 1947.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Pierce, J. R., and L. M. Field, “Traveling-Wave Tubes,” Proc. IRE, Vol. 35, pg. 108, February 1947.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Pond, N. H., and C. G. Lob, “Fifty Years Ago Today or On Choosing a Microwave Tube,” Microwave Journal, pp. 226–238, September 1988.Google Scholar
  19. Priest, D., and M. Shrader, “The Klystrode—An Unusual Transmitting Tube with Potential for UHF-TV,” Proceedings of the IEEE, Vol. 70, no. 11, IEEE, New York, November 1982.Google Scholar
  20. Shrader, Merrald B., “Klystrode Technology Update,” Proceedings of the NAB Engineering Conference, National Association of Broadcasters, Washington, DC, 1988.Google Scholar
  21. Spangenberg, Karl, Vacuum Tubes, McGraw-Hill, New York, 1947.Google Scholar
  22. Terman, F. E., Radio Engineering, 3rd Ed., McGraw-Hill, New York, 1947.Google Scholar
  23. Varian, R., and S. Varian, “A High-Frequency Oscillator and Amplifier,” J. Applied Phys., Vol 10, pg. 321, May 1939.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Webster, D. L., “Cathode Bunching,” J. Applied Physics, Vol. 10, pg. 501, July 1939.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Whitaker, J. C., and T. Blankenship, “Comparing Integral and External Cavity Klystrons,” Broadcast Engineering, Intertec Publishing, Overland Park, KS, November 1988.Google Scholar
  26. Whitaker, J. C., Radio Frequency Transmission Systems: Design and Operation, McGraw-Hill, New York, 1991.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jerry C. Whitaker

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations