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Safe Handling of Vacuum Tube Devices

  • Jerry C. Whitaker

Abstract

Electrical safety is important when working with any type of electronic hardware. Because vacuum tubes operate at high voltages and currents, safety is doubly important. The primary areas of concern, from a safety standpoint, include:
  • Electric shock

  • Nonionizing radiation

  • Beryllium oxide (BeO) ceramic dust

  • Hot surfaces of vacuum tube devices

  • Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs)

Keywords

Circuit Breaker Vacuum Tube Dielectric Fluid Beryllium Oxide Safe Handling 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jerry C. Whitaker

There are no affiliations available

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