Advertisement

The Employee Assistance Program: Raising Productivity by Lifting Constraints

  • Jeffery Scott Mio
  • Craig K. Goishi

Abstract

The employee assistance program (EAP) movement has gained strength in recent decades. The goal of the EAP is to work hand in hand with management and labor to increase the productivity of troubled workers by addressing alcohol, drug abuse, or other types of mental health related problems.

Keywords

Social Distance Penetration Rate Alcoholic Anonymous Dual Relationship Employee Assistance 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Albert, W. C., Smythe, R. C., and Brook, R. C. (1985). Promises to keep: An evaluator’s perspective on employee assistance programs. Evaluation and Program Planning 8, 175–182.Google Scholar
  2. Blum, K. (1984). Handbook of abusable drugs New York: Gardner Press.Google Scholar
  3. Brandes, S. D. (1970). American welfare capitalism Chicago: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  4. Briar, K. H., and Vinet, M. (1985). Ethical questions concerning an EAP: Who is the client? (Company or individual?) In S. H. Klarreich, J. L. Prancek, and C. E. Moore (Eds.), The human resources management handbook: Principles and practice of employee assistance programs (pp. 342–359 ). New York: Praeger Publishers.Google Scholar
  5. Cermak, T. L. (1986). Diagnostic criteria for codependency. Journal of Psychoactive Drugs 18, 15–20.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Edwards, D. W. (1975). The evaluation of troubled-employee and occupational programs. In R. L. Williams and G. H. Moffat (Eds.), Occupational alcoholism programs (pp. 40–135 ). Springfield, IL: Charles C. Thomas.Google Scholar
  7. Ford, J. D., and Ford, J. G. (1986). A systems theory analysis of employee assistance programs. Employee Assistance Quarterly 2, 37–48.Google Scholar
  8. Franz, J. B. (1986). Referral-making: A key EAP skill. Employee Assistance Quarterly 2, 1–10.Google Scholar
  9. Gierymski, T., and Williams, T. (1986). Codependency. Journal of Psychoactive Drugs 18, 7–13.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Good, R. K. (1986). Employee assistance: A critique of three corporate drug abuse policies. Personnel Journal 65, 96–101.Google Scholar
  11. Croeneveld, J., Shain, M., Brayshaw, D., Keaney, J., and Laird, L. (1985). Cost effectiveness of EAP: Testing assumptions. Employee Assistance Quarterly 1, 75–87.Google Scholar
  12. Heyman, M. (1976). Referral to alcoholism programs in industry: Coercion, confrontation and choice. Journal of Studies on Alcohol 37, 900–908.Google Scholar
  13. Heyman, M. (1978). Alcoholism programs in industry New Brunswick, NJ: Publications Division, Rutgers Center for Alcohol Studies.Google Scholar
  14. Hoffman, E., and Roman, P. L. (1984). Effects of supervisory style and experientially based frames of reference on organizational alcoholism programs. Journal of Studies on Alcohol 45, 260–267.Google Scholar
  15. Jerrell, J. M., and Rightmyer, J. F. (1982). Evaluating employee assistance programs: A review of methods, outcomes, and future directions. Evaluation and Program Planning 5, 255–267.Google Scholar
  16. Korr, W. S., and Ruez, J. F. (1986). How employee assistance programs determine service utilization: A survey and recommendations. Evaluation and Program Planning 9, 367–371.Google Scholar
  17. Lesser, J. G., and Cavaseno, V. H. (1986). Establishing a hospital’sGoogle Scholar
  18. employee assistance program. Health and Social Work 11, 126–132.Google Scholar
  19. Manuso, J. S. J. (1983). (Ed.). Occupational clinical psychology New York: Praeger Publishers.Google Scholar
  20. Miller, R. E. (1986). EAP research then and now. Employee Assistance Quarterly 2, 49–86.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Putnam, S. L., and Stout, R. L. (1985). Evaluating employee assistance policy in an HMO-based alcoholism project. Evaluation and Program Planning 8, 183–194.Google Scholar
  22. Quayle, D. (1985). American productivity: The devastating effect of alcoholism and drug abuse. In J. F. Dickman, W. G. Emener, Jr., and W. S. Hutchison, Jr. (Eds.), Counseling the troubled person in industry: A guide to the organization, implementation, and evaluation of employee assistance programs (pp. 2–29 ). Springfield, IL: Charles C. Thomas.Google Scholar
  23. Rinella, V. (1986). Ethical issues and psychiatric cost-containment strategies. International Journal of Law and Psychiatry 9, 125–136.Google Scholar
  24. Roethlisberger, F., and Dickson, W. J. (1939). Management and the worker Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  25. Schramm, C. J., Mandell, W., and Archer, J. (1978). Workers who drink: Their treatment in an industrial setting Lexington, MA: D. C. Heath and Company.Google Scholar
  26. Shain, M., and Groeneveld, J. (1980). Employee assistance programs: Philosophy, theory, and practice Lexington, MA: D. C. Heath and Company.Google Scholar
  27. Shain, M., Suurvali, H., and Boutilier, M. (1986). Healthier workers: Health promotion and employee assistance programs Lexington, MA: D. C. Heath and Company.Google Scholar
  28. Shirley, C. E. (1985). TOPEX study: “Hitting bottom in high places.” In S. H. Klarreich, J. L. Francek, and C. E. Moore (Eds.), The human resources management handbook: Principles and practice of employee assistance programs (pp. 360–369 ). New York: Praeger Publishers.Google Scholar
  29. Sonnenstuhl, W. J., and Trice, H. M. (1986). Strategies for employee assistance programs: The crucial balance. Key Issues: Background reports on current topics and trends in labor-managements, No. 30 Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.Google Scholar
  30. Trice, H. M. (1962). Alcoholism in industry: Modern procedures New York: Christopher D. Smithers Foundation.Google Scholar
  31. Trice, H. M., and Beyer, J. M. (1977). Differential use of an alcoholism policy in federal organizations by skill level of employees. In C. J. Schramm (Ed.), Alcoholism and its treatment in industry (pp. 44–68 ). Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press.Google Scholar
  32. Trice, H. M., and Beyer, J. M. (1984). Work-related outcomes of the constructive-confrontation strategy in a job-based alcoholism program. Journal of Studies on Alcohol 45, 393–404.Google Scholar
  33. Virgil, L. D. (1986). The EAP movement and organizational development: Working together for mutual benefit. Employee Assistance Quarterly 1, 35–48.Google Scholar
  34. Wrich, J. T.(1980). The employee assistance program Minneapolis: Hazelden Foundation.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jeffery Scott Mio
    • 1
  • Craig K. Goishi
    • 2
  1. 1.Washington State UniversityPullmanUSA
  2. 2.Institute for Motivational DevelopmentNewport BeachUSA

Personalised recommendations