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Software Usability and Productivity

  • Thomas G. Cocklin

Abstract

Computers play an integral role in our lives. Computer systems perform a wide variety of tasks automatically that were once done manually. They have literally changed the way people do business, teach their children lessons, heal themselves, and keep themselves informed on a daily basis. Computers control monetary flow, speed the judicial process, decipher our past and shape our future.

Keywords

Conceptual Model Mental Model Input Device Direct Manipulation Task Structure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas G. Cocklin
    • 1
  1. 1.Hewlett-PackardFt. CollinsUSA

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