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Luteinizing Hormone-Releasing Hormone Independently Stimulates Cytodifferentiation of Granulosa Cells

  • J. H. Dorrington
  • H. L. McKeracher
  • A. Chan
  • R. E. Gore-Langton
Part of the Biochemical Endocrinology book series (BIOEND)

Abstract

Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) and the potent LHRH agonists are known to inhibit various hormone-regulated reproductive processes in the female rat. These inhibitory effects include inhibition of ovarian follicular maturation (Johnson et al., 1976) and ovulation (Baumann et al., 1980), delay of implant-ation (Lin and Yoshinaga, 1976), termination of pregnancy in its early stages (Corbin and Beattie, 1975) and delay of parturition (Bercu et al., 1980). These actions of LHRH in vivo are associated with decreases in the circulating levels of estrogen and progesterone, and may therefore account, at least in part, for the observed inhibitory effects. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the inhibitory effects observed in vivo; exogenous LHRH may directly desensitize the pituitary causing reduced gonadotrophin secretion, an effect which would require long-term treatment. Alternatively, gonadal cells may be desensitized by the excessive gonadotrophin secretion produced by the acute stimulation of the pituitary by LHRH. LHRH and the potent agonists also directly inhibit the actions of FSH and LH on the stimulation of progesterone or estrogen secretion by rat granulosa and luteal cells. These actions appear to be mediated through the specific high-affinity receptors which are present on granulosa cells (Jones and Hsueh., 1981; Pieper et al., 1981) and luteal cells (Pieper et al., 1981; Clayton et al., 1979). Knecht and Catt (1981) have suggested that the mechanism of direct inhibition of granulosa cell functions may be due to the inhibition of the FSH-induced decrease in cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase and the FSH-induced increase in adenylate cyclase activity.

Keywords

Granulosa Cell Aromatase Activity Luteal Cell Dominant Follicle LHRH Agonist 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. H. Dorrington
    • 1
    • 2
  • H. L. McKeracher
    • 1
    • 2
  • A. Chan
    • 1
    • 2
  • R. E. Gore-Langton
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Banting and Best Department of Medical ResearchUniversity of TorontoLondonCanada
  2. 2.Department of PhysiologyUniversity of Western OntarioLondonCanada

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