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The Stereo Long-Playing (LP) Record

  • John M. Eargle

Abstract

The stereo LP has rapidly declined in sales due to the immense success of the CD. Since 1947 to the present, however, the LP has represented a long period of compatibility between product and players in the history of consumer audio, exceeded only by the era of the 78 rpm disc in the early part of this century.

Keywords

Section View Variable Pitch Depth Control Tracking Angle Recording Engineering 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Chapman & Hall, New York, NY 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • John M. Eargle

There are no affiliations available

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