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Compact Ranges

  • Eugene F. Knott

Abstract

The limited size of indoor chambers precludes the measurement of large test objects under protective cover, yet the need to collect RCS data in such an environment persists. Impelled by requirements to measure the RCS characteristics of large airframe components, such as those found in the Stealth Bomber and the Advanced Tactical Aircraft, at least two large airframe manufacturers built compact ranges of unprecedented size in the late 1980s. Despite the perceived need for these kinds of measurements, however, one of the two was unable to exploit its investment in these capabilities. With insufficient internal projects to support its compact range, McDonnell Douglas attempted to peddle its facility in the early 1990s to any and all customers who could afford the $12500 shift charge for eight hours of chamber use [1]. Whether the marketing scheme was successful or not, the facility and its capabilities were impressive.

Keywords

Focal Length Incident Field Target Zone Rear Face Main Reflector 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Van Nostrand Reinhold 1993

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  • Eugene F. Knott

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