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Indoor Chambers

  • Eugene F. Knott

Abstract

There are two kinds of indoor RCS test chamber: compact and otherwise. The compact range relies on an antenna that is so large that all test objects measured in the chamber are in the near field of the antenna. The antennas used in all other indoor chambers are much smaller, with the consequence that the far-field criterion developed in Chapter 4 is just as much a consideration in those chambers as it is outdoors. The differences in the design and operation of the two kinds of chamber are great enough that we treat them in separate chapters. We discuss all others in this chapter, reserving Chapter 8 for compact ranges.

Keywords

Target Zone Antenna Pattern Rear Wall Anechoic Chamber Tapered Section 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Van Nostrand Reinhold 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eugene F. Knott

There are no affiliations available

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