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Instrumentation Systems

  • Eugene F. Knott

Abstract

Our discussion of instrumentation systems will be cursory at best, because this book emphasizes the electromagnetic features of the signals to be measured, not the means by which they are recorded. Despite our general treatment of instrumentation, however, the reader is provided with enough specific information to make judgments about design issues. Our discussion begins with the simple CW (continuous wave) instrumentation system, which was once popular because of its low cost, and which was at one time the only kind of radar operated indoors. Its low cost came at a high operational price, however: its stability was often measured in minutes, and it was therefore very frustrating to operate.

Keywords

Intermediate Frequency Pulse Radar Frequency Synthesizer Instrumentation System Range Gate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Van Nostrand Reinhold 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eugene F. Knott

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