Advertisement

Northern Waif Primates and Rodents

  • Albert E. Wood
Part of the Topics in Geobiology book series (TGBI, volume 4)

Abstract

Whatever the origins of the members of the basic Paleocene and Eocene stocks of South American mammals (Simpson, 1950, pp. 368–373; 1978, p. 321; Patterson and Pascual, 1972, pp. 260–276; McKenna, 1981, pp. 56–70; Pascual et al, Chapter 8, this volume; Cifelli, Chapter 9, this volume), no new mammal types are known from the South American Eocene that would suggest any invasion of the continent from abroad. In the Deseadan, however, two orders appear for the first time in South America, the primates and the rodents, with no known possible South American ancestors. There is essentially universal agreement that the ancestors of the earliest known South American representatives of these orders reached that continent from abroad. Both orders (but not the suborders found in South America] are well known from the Paleocene and Eocene of the northern continents.

Keywords

Deciduous Tooth World Monkey Late Eocene Continental Drift Carotid Canal 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Archer, M., and Bartholomew A., 1978, Tertiary mammals of Australia; a synoptic review, Alchermga 2:1–19.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Berggren, A., and Van Couvering, J. A., 1974, The late Neogene. Biostratigraphy, geochronology and paleoclimatology of the last 15 million years in marine and continental sequences. Palaeogeog- raphy, Palaeoclimatology and Palaeoecology 16(2):pp. 1–216.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Black, C. C., and Sutton, J. F., 1984, Paleocene and Eocene rodents of North America, in: Papers in Vertebrate Paleontology (R. M. Mengel ed.), Carnegie Mus. Nat. Hist. Spec. Publ. 9, pp. 67–84.Google Scholar
  4. Bugge, J., 1974, The cephalic arterial system in Insectivores, Primates, Rodents and Lagomorphs, with special reference to the systematic classification, Acta anat. 87(Suppl. 62):1–160.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Bugge, J., 1981, Comparative anatomical study of the carotid circulation in New and Old World Primates: Implications for their evolutionary history, in: Evolutionary biology of the New World Monkeys and Continental Drift (R. L. Ciochon and A. B. Chiarelli, eds.), Plenum Press, New York, pp. 293–316.Google Scholar
  6. Carleton, M. D., and Musser, G. G., 1984, Muroid rodents, in: Orders and Families of Recent Mammals of the World (S. Anderson and J. K. Jones, Jr., eds.), John Wiley & Sons, New York, pp. 289–379.Google Scholar
  7. Ciochon, R. L., and Chiarelli, A. B. (eds.), 1981, Evolutionary Biology of the New World Monkeys and Continental Drift, Plenum Press, New York.Google Scholar
  8. Croizat, L., 1979, Review of: Biogeographie: Fauna und flora der Erde und ihre geschichtliche Entwicklung, by P. Bănărescu and N. Boşcaiu, Syst. Zool. 28:250–252.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Delson, E., and Rosenberger, A. L., 1981, Phyletic perspectives on platyrrhine origins and anthropoid relationships, in: Evolutionary biology of the New World Monkeys and Continental Drift (R. L. Ciochon and A. B. Chiarelli, eds.), Plenum Press, New York, pp. 445–458.Google Scholar
  10. Donnelly, T. W., 1975, The geological evolution of the Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico—some critical problems and areas, in: The Ocean Basins and Margins, Vol. 3, The Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean (A. E. M. Nairn and F. G. Stehli, eds.), Plenum Press, New York, pp. 663–689.Google Scholar
  11. Ferrusquía-Villafranca, I., 1978, Distribution of Cenozoic vertebrate faunas in Middle America and problems of migration between North and South America, in: Conexiones Terrestres Entre Norte y Sudamerica (I. Ferrusquía-Villafranca, ed.), Univ. Nal. Auton. Mexico Inst. Geol. Bol. 101:193–321.Google Scholar
  12. Gazin, C. L., 1958, A review of the Middle and Upper Eocene primates of North America, Smithson. Misc. Col. 136(1):1–112.Google Scholar
  13. George, W., 1981, Blood vascular patterns in rodents: contribution to an analysis of rodent family relationships, Zool. J. Linn. Soc. 73:287–306.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Gingerich, P. D., 1981, Eocene Adapidae, paleobiogeography and the origin of South American Pla-tyrrhini, in: Evolutionary Biology of the New World Monkeys and Continental Drift (R. L. Ciochon and A. B. Chiarelli, eds.), Plenum Press, New York, pp. 123–138.Google Scholar
  15. Hartenberger, J. L., 1982, A review of the Eocene rodents of Pakistan, Contr. Mus. Paleontol. Univ. Mich. 26:19–35.Google Scholar
  16. Hoffstetter, R., 1969, Un primate de l’Oligocène inférieur sud-Américain: Branisella boliviano gen. et sp. nov., C. R.Acad. Sci. Paris (D) 269:434–437.Google Scholar
  17. Hoffstetter, R., 1971, Le peuplement mammalien de l’Amérique du Sud. Rôle des continents austraux comme centres d’origine, de diversification et de dispersion pour certains groupes mammaliens, An. Acad. Bras. Cienc. 43(Suppl.):125–144.Google Scholar
  18. Hoffstetter, R., 1972, Origine et dispersion des rongeurs hystricognathes. C. R. Acad. Sci. Paris (D) 274:2867–2870.Google Scholar
  19. Hoffstetter, R., 1973, Origine, compréhension et signification des taxons de rang supérieur: quelques ensignments tirés de l’histoire des mammifères, Ann. Paléontol. (Verts.) 59:137–169.Google Scholar
  20. Hoffstetter, R., 1974, Phylogeny and geographical deployment of the primates, J. Hum. Evol. 3:327–350.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Hoffstetter, R., 1975, El origen de los Caviomorpha y el problema de los Hystricognathi (Rodentia), Actas Primer. Congr. Paleontol. Paleontol. Bioestrat, Tucumán, Argent 2:505–528.Google Scholar
  22. Hoffstetter, R., 1977, Primates, filogenia e historia biogeographica, Studia Geologica (Salamanca) 13:211–253.Google Scholar
  23. Hoffstetter, R., 1981, Origin and deployment of New World monkeys emphasizing the southern continents route, in: Evolutionary Biology of the New World Monkeys and Continental Drift (R. L. Ciochon and A. B. Chiarelli, eds.), Plenum Press, New York, pp. 103–122.Google Scholar
  24. Jacobs, L. L., 1977, A new genus of murid rodent from the Miocene of Pakistan and comments on the origin of the Muridae, Paleo Bios 25:1–11.Google Scholar
  25. Kay, R. F., 1981, Platyrrhine origins: a reappraisal of the dental evidence, in: Evolutionary Biology of the New World Monkeys and Continental Drift (R. L. Ciochon and A. B. Chiarelli, eds.), Plenum Press, New York, pp. 159–188.Google Scholar
  26. Korth, W. W., 1984, Earliest Tertiary evolution and radiation of rodents in North America, Bull. Carnegie Mus. Nat. Hist. 24:1–71.Google Scholar
  27. Korvenkontio, V. A., 1934, Mikroskopische Untersuchungen an Nagerincisiven unter Hinweis auf die Schmelzstruktur der Backenzähne. Histologisch-phyletische Studie, Ann. ZooJ. Soc. Zool.-Bot. Fennicae Vanamo 2:i–xiv, 1–274.Google Scholar
  28. Landry, S. C., Jr., 1957, The interrelationships of the New and Old World hystricomorph rodents, Univ. Calif. Publ. Zool. 56:1–118.Google Scholar
  29. Lavocat, R., 1961. Le gisement de vertébrés Miocènes de Beni Mellal. Serv. Géol. Maroc, Notes et Mémoires, no. 155, pp. 1–144.Google Scholar
  30. Lavocat, R., 1969, La systématique des rongeurs hystricomorphes et la dérive des continents, C. R. Acad. Sci.Paris (D) 269:1496–1497.Google Scholar
  31. Lavocat, R., 1971, Affinités systématique des caviomorphes et des phiomorphes et origine Africaine des caviomorphes, An. Acad. Bras. Cienc. 43(Supl.):515–522.Google Scholar
  32. Lavocat, R., 1973, Les rongeurs du Miocène d’Afrique Orientale. 1. Miocène inférieur. Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes, Inst. de Montpellier, Mém. 1: iv + 284 pp.; 44 pls. in separate folder.Google Scholar
  33. Lavocat, R., 1974a, The interrelationships between the African and South American rodents and their bearing on the problems of the origin of the South American monkeys, J. Human Evol. 3:323–326.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. Lavocat, R., 1974b, What is an hystricognath? Zool. Soc. Lond.Symp. 34:7–19; discussion, 55–60.Google Scholar
  35. Lavocat, R., 1976, Rongeurs caviomorphes de l’Oligocène de Bolivie. II. Rongeurs du Bassin Déséadien de Salla-Luribay. Palaeovertebrata 7:15–90.Google Scholar
  36. Lavocat, R., 1981, The implications of rodent paleontology and biogeography to the geographical sources and origin of the platyrrhine primates, in: Evolutionary Biology of the New World Monkeys and Continental Drift (R. L. Ciochon and A. B. Chiarelli, eds.), Plenum Press, New York, pp. 93–102.Google Scholar
  37. Lee, A. K., Baverstock, P. R., and Watts, C. H. S., 1981, Rodents—the late invaders, in: Ecological Biogeography of Australia (A. Keast, ed.), The Hague, W. Junk, pp. 1522–1553.Google Scholar
  38. Macfadden, B. J., Campbell, K. E. Jr., Cifelli, R. L., Johnson, N. M., Zeiler, P. K., and Siles, O. 1985.Magnetic polarity stratigraphy and mammalian biostratigraphy of the Deseadan (late Oligocene-early Miocene) Salla Beds of northern Bolivia (in press)Google Scholar
  39. Malfait, B. T., and Dinkelman, M. G., 1978, Circum-Caribbean tectonic and igneous activity and the evolution of the Caribbean Plate, Bull. Geol. Soc. Am. 83:251–271.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  40. Marshall, L. G., Pascual, R., Curtiss, G. H., and Drake, R. E. 1977. South American geochronology. Radiometric time scales for middle to late Tertiary mammal-bearing horizons of Patagonia, Science 195:1325–1328.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  41. Matthew, W. D., and Granger, W., 1923, New Bathyergidae from the Oligocene of Mongolia, Am. Mus. Novitat 101:1–5.Google Scholar
  42. McKenna, M. 1981. Early history and biogeography of South America’s extinct land mammals, in: Evolutionary Biology of New World Monkeys and Continental Drift (R. L. Ciochon and A. B. Chiarelli, eds.), Plenum Press, New York, pp. 43–77.Google Scholar
  43. Moody, P. A., and Doninger, D. A., 1956, Serologic light on porcupine relationships, Evolution 10:47–55.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  44. Orlosky, F. J., 1981, Dental evolutionary trends of relevance to the origin and dispersal of the New World monkeys, in: Evolutionary Biology of the New World Monkeys and Continental Drift (R. L. Ciochon and A. B. Chiarelli, eds.), Plenum Press, New York, pp. 189–200.Google Scholar
  45. Pascual, R., Ortega Hinojosa, E. J., Gondar, D., and Tonni, E., 1965, Las edades del Cenozoico mam-malifero de la Argentina, con especial atencion a aquellas del territorio bonaerense, An. Com. Invest. Cient. Buenos Aires 6:165–193.Google Scholar
  46. Patterson, B., and Pascual, R. 1972. The fossil mammal fauna of South America, in: Evolution, Mammals and Southern Continents (A. Keast, F. C. Erk, and B. Glass, eds.), State University of New York Press, Albany, pp. 247–309.Google Scholar
  47. Patterson, B., and Wood, A. E., 1982, Rodents from the Deseadan Oligocene of Bolivia and the relationships of the Caviomorpha, Bull. Mus. Comp. Zool. 149:371–543.Google Scholar
  48. Perfit, M. R., and Heezen, B. C., 1978, The geology and evolution of the Cayman Trench, Bull. Geol. Soc. Am. 89:1155–1174.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  49. Quentin, J.-C. 1973, Les Oxyurinae de Rongeurs. Bull. Mus. Hist. Nat., 167(3):1046–1096.Google Scholar
  50. Rosenberger, A. L., and Szalay, F. S., 1981, On the Tarsiiform origins of the Anthropoidea, in: Evolutionary Biology of the New World Monkeys and Continental Drift (R. L. Ciochon and A. B. Chiarelli, eds.), Plenum Press, New York, pp. 139–157.Google Scholar
  51. Sahni, A., Bhatia, S. B., Hartenberger, J.-L., Jaeger, J.-J., Kumar, K., Sudre, J., and Vianey-Liaud, M., 1981, Vertebrates from the Subathu formation and comments on the biogeography of Indian subcontinent during the early Paleogene, Bull. Soc. Géol. Fr. 1981. (7) 23:689–695.Google Scholar
  52. Sarich, V. M., and Cronin, J. E., 1981, South American mammal molecular systematics, evolutionary clocks, and continental drift, in: Evolutionary Biology of the New World Monkeys and Continental Drift (R. L. Ciochon and A. B. Chiarelli, eds.), Plenum Press, New York, pp. 399–421.Google Scholar
  53. Savage, D. A., 1975, Cenozoic-the Primate episode, in: Approaches to Primate Paleobiology, (F. S. Szalay, ed.), Contr. Primat. 5:2–27.Google Scholar
  54. Savage, R. J. G., 1969, Early Tertiary mammal locality in southern Libya, Proc. Geol. Soc. Lond. 1969. 1657:167–171.Google Scholar
  55. Savage, R. J. G., 1971, Review of the fossil mammals of Libya. Symposium Geology Libya, Fac. Sci. Univ. Libya, pp. 217–225.Google Scholar
  56. Simons, E. L., 1968, African Oligocene mammals: Introduction, history of study, and faunal succession. Part I of: Early Cenozoic Mammalian Faunas, Fayum Province, Egypt, Bull. Peabody Mus. Nat. Hist. 28:1–21.Google Scholar
  57. Simpson, G. G., 1950, History of the fauna of Latin America, Am. Sci. 38:361–389.Google Scholar
  58. Simpson, G. G., 1978, Early mammals in South America: Fact, controversy, and mystery, Proc. Am. Philos. Soc. 122 812:318–328.Google Scholar
  59. Simpson, G. G. 1980, Splendid Isolation, The Curious History of South American Mammais, Yale University Press, New Haven.Google Scholar
  60. Simpson, G. G., Minoprio, J. L., and Patterson, B. 1962. The mammalian fauna of the Divisadero Largo Formation, Mendoza, Argentina, Bull. Mus. Comp. Zool. 127:237–293.Google Scholar
  61. Stromer, E., 1926, Reste Land- und Süsswasser-bewohnender Wirbeltiere aus dem Diamantenfeldern Deutsch-Südwestafrikas, in: Die Diamantenwüste Südwestafrikas by E. Kaiser. Dietrich Reimer, Berlin, vol. 2, pp. 107–153.Google Scholar
  62. Szalay, F. S., 1976, Systematics of the Omomyidae (Tarsiiformes, Primates), taxonomy, phylogeny and adaptations, Bull. Am. Mus.Nat. Hist. 156:157–449.Google Scholar
  63. Tarling, D. H., 1981, The geologic evolution of South America with special reference to the last 200 million years, in: Evolutionary biology of the New World Monkeys and Continental Drift (R. L. Ciochon and A. B. Chiarelli, eds.), Plenum Press, New York, pp. 1–41.Google Scholar
  64. Tomblin, J. F., 1975, The Lesser Antilles and Aves Ridge, in: The Ocean Basins and Margins, Vol. 3, The Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean [A. E. M. Nairn and F. G. Stehli, eds.), Plenum Press, New York, pp. 467–500.Google Scholar
  65. Tullberg, T., 1899, Ueber das System der Nagethiere: eine phylogenetische Studie, Nova Acta Reg. Soc. Scient. Upsala (3), 18, v + 514 pp.Google Scholar
  66. Webb, S. D., 1978, A history of savanna vertebrates in the New World. Part II. South America and the great interchange, Ann. Rev. Ecol. Syst. 9:393–426.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  67. Webb, S. D., and Marshall, L. G., 1982, Historical Biogeography of Recent South American land mammals, Pyamuting Lab. Ecol. Spec. Publ. 6:39–52.Google Scholar
  68. Wolff, R. G., 1984a, A new early Oligocène argyrolagid (Mammalia: Marsupialia) from Salla, Bolivia, Jour. Vert. Paleontol. 4:108–113.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  69. Wolff, R. G., 1984b, New specimens of the primate BraniScila boliviano from the early Oligocene of Salla, Bolivia,J. Vert.Paieontol. 4:570–574.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  70. Wood, A. E., 1968, The African Oligocene Rodentia. Part II of: Early Cenozoic Mammalian Faunas, Fayum Province, Egypt, Bull. Peabody Mus. Nat. Hist. 28:23–105.Google Scholar
  71. Wood, A. E., 1975, The problem of the hystricognathous rodents, in: Studies on Cenozoic Paleontology and Stratigraphy in Honor of Claude W. Hibbard, Claude W. Hibbard Memorial Vol. 3, University of Michigan, Papers on Paleontology 12 (G. R. Smith and N. E. Friedland, eds.), pp. 75–80.Google Scholar
  72. Wood, A. E., 1981, The origin of the caviomorph rodents from a source in Middle America: A clue to the area of origin of platyrrhine primates, in: Evolutionary Biology of the New World Monkeys and Continental Drift (R. L. Ciochon and A. B. Chiarelli, eds.), Plenum Press, New York, pp. 79–91.Google Scholar
  73. Wood, A. E., 1983, The radiation of the Order Rodentia in the southern continents: The dates, numbers and sources of the invasions, Schriftenr. geol. Wiss., Berlin 19/20:381–393.Google Scholar
  74. Wood, A. E., 1984, Hystricognathy in the North American Oligocene rodent Cylindrodon and the origin of the Caviomorpha, Carnegie Mus. Spec. Publ. 9:151–160.Google Scholar
  75. Wood, A. E., 1985, The relationships, origin and dispersal of the hystricognathous rodents, in: Evolutionary Relationships among Rodents (W. P. Luckett and J.-L. Hartenberger, eds.), Plenum Press, New York, 475–513.Google Scholar
  76. Wood, A. E., and Patterson, B., 1959, The rodents of the Deseadan Oligocene of Patagonia and the beginnings of South American rodent evolution, Bull. Mus. Comp. Zool. 120:279–428.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Albert E. Wood
    • 1
  1. 1.Amherst CollegeAmherstUSA

Personalised recommendations