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Visual Illusions

  • M. A. Ali
  • M. A. Klyne

Abstract

Vision is an active process. The image on the retina is essentially two-dimensional, yet the world is perceived as three-dimensional. Retinal images are but patterns in the eye — patterns of light and dark shapes, with areas of colour — however we do not see patterns, we see objects. Retinal images have no clear boundaries, yet they give the presence of separate, distinct objects; this is brought about by perception. Thus, perception can be thought of as the reading of non-sensed characteristics of objects from available sensory data. It involves a kind of problem solving and is governed by our basic knowledge of objects. We not only believe what we see, to some extent we see what we believe. However, perception can go wrong in many ways, and when this happens visual illusions result. These illusions are of great interest to psychologists.

Keywords

Retinal Image Visual Illusion Poggendorff Illusion Necker Cube Ponzo Illusion 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. A. Ali
    • 1
  • M. A. Klyne
    • 1
  1. 1.Université de MontréalMontrealCanada

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