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UV/Ozone Cleaning of Surfaces

  • John R. Vig

Abstract

The ability of ultraviolet (UV) light to decompose organic molecules has been known for a long time, but it is only during the past decade that UV cleaning of surfaces has been explored.

Keywords

Ozone Concentration Clean Surface Quartz Resonator Thin Film Hybrid Quartz Crystal Resonator 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • John R. Vig
    • 1
  1. 1.U.S. Army Electronics Technology and Devices LaboratoryLABCOMFort MonmouthUSA

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