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The Compatibility of Refractory Metals with Liquid Metals

  • E. E. Hoffman
  • R. W. Harrison
Conference paper

Abstract

Both basic investigations and engineering experiments conducted for the most part during the last ten years have demonstrated that refractory metals generally have excellent compatibility with liquid metals. The temperature range of usefulness of the refractory metals begins at temperatures where conventional superalloys still have nominal mechanical strength but do not have the required resistance to corrosion by the liquid metals. The excellent compatibility of refractory metals with liquid metals can be degraded by impurity elements, and the controls required to assure compatibility will be presented.

The most significant investigations of refractory metal — alkali metal compatibility have been performed to establish the required technology for the development of Rankine cycle nuclear electric space power systems. This compatibility review is limited to the most significant results obtained in flowing systems where careful control was exercised to control test variables. The discussion will be limited to tests of refractory metals in contact with mercury, cesium, potassium, sodium, and lithium. A detailed review is presented describing the compatibility results obtained in a 5000-hour test of a two-loop Cb-1Zr facility in which sodium was circulated in the heater circuit and potassium was boiled and circulated in a two-phase secondary loop which contained turbine simulator test sections of Mo-TZM alloy.

Keywords

Alkali Metal Liquid Metal Refractory Metal Rankine Cycle Vapor Quality 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© American Institute of Mining, Metallurgical, and Petrolium Engineers, Inc. 1968

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. E. Hoffman
    • 1
  • R. W. Harrison
    • 1
  1. 1.General Electric CompanyCincinnatiUSA

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